Another key U.S. infrastructure installation has gone up in flames as Radius Recycling in Columbus, Ga., EXPLODED over the weekend

It seems like every other day we are reporting on another key piece of United States infrastructure that has exploded or gone up in flames, with the latest incident occurring at Radius Recycling, formerly known as Schnitzer Steel, in Columbus, Ga.

According to reports that are still developing, large flames and smoke were seen coming from behind a steel recycling plant, located at 712 Tenth Ave. in Columbus.

WTVM reported that Columbus Fire & EMS arrived on the scene quickly to deal with a fire at the facility. Fire Chief John Shull says no injuries or bystanders have been reported.

The intersection of Jackson Ave. and Victory Dr., along with most of Cussetta Rd., had to be closed off due to the explosion and fire. As of now, there is no clear indication as to what caused the fire and explosion.

(Related: There was also another train “accident” this past week in Nebraska that resulted in the release of perchloric acid, prompting area evacuations.)

Prior to fire, Radius Recycling was named “world’s most sustainable company”

About a month prior to this incident, Radius Recycling was named the world’s most sustainable company.

The $2.5 billion company with “more than a century’s expertise in metals recycling,” to quote Forbes‘ Karen Walker, is one of North America’s largest manufacturers and exporters of recycled metal products.

“… the company’s integrated operating model advances a circular economy where metals never become waste and are redesigned into new products,” Walker explained in the piece.

Brighteon.TV

Originally known as The Alaska Junk Company before being renamed Schnitzer, and again later renamed Radius Recycling, the company was founded in 1906 by a Russian immigrant named Sam Schnitzer who saw value in recycling metals. Today, the company is a component of the Russell 2000 Index, boasting around 3,500 employees.

“Many people don’t understand the vital role of metal in society and civilization. The use of metal and the rise of civilization are highly correlated,” stated Tamara Lundgren, the chairwoman, president and CEO of Radius Recycling.

“For example, steel is the most recycled commodity in the world. There’s more steel recycled every year than glass, paper, plastic and wood combined. Unlike paper, which ultimately dissipates once recycled too many times, steel can be recycled infinitely.”

Interestingly, Radius Recycling also recycles nonferrous metals such as copper and aluminum, two metals that are increasingly vital as the world transitions to “low-carbon” technologies.

The timing of this fire and explosion, as well as the nature of Radius Recycling’s business, is highly suspicious seeing as how there has been a string of mysterious fires and explosions occurring at vital components of the United States infrastructure for the past several years now.

Radius Recycling boasts facilities that it says are run by net-carbon-free electricity, having reduced its “greenhouse gas” emissions by 24 percent since 2019. Just last year, the company introduced net-carbon-zero GRN Steel products, which are carbon offsets and renewable energy credits that address manufacturing emissions.

“The transition to low-carbon technologies and its success is linked to our ability to recycle metals,” Lundgren boasted in the past.

“The low-carbon technologies, like electric vehicles and solar and wind power, are all more metal-intensive and Radius makes some of the world’s lowest carbon, net-carbon-free steel.”

It is concerning that not only has there been no explanation provided as of yet for the string of other mysterious fires and explosions that have occurred in recent months, but also that this particular recycling company plays such a critical role in America’s “sustainable” future.

Is U.S. infrastructure under attack by domestic terrorists and other nefarious players? Find out more at Chaos.news.

Sources for this article include:

GeorgiaRecord.com

WTVM.com

NaturalNews.com

Forbes.com



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By GIL